TEACHING PEIRCE TO

UNDERGRADUATES

 

 

 

A 90 minute discussion to take place during the annual meeting of

The Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy

 

8-10 March 2007

University of South Carolina

Columbia, SC

 

Co-Sponsored by

The American Association of Philosophy Teachers

 

 

Chair:              James Campbell, The University of Toledo

 

Speakers:        Cornelis de Waal, Indiana University – Purdue University, Indianapolis

                        Matt Flamm, Rockford College

                        Kathleen Hull, New York University

                        Rosa Mayorga, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Michael Raposa, Lehigh University

                       

 

In contemporary society, philosophers are almost always philosophy teachers.  In this session, we will turn our attention from exploring and evaluating the infinitely fascinating ideas of Charles Sanders Peirce to the question of sharing them with undergraduates. Some of the specific topics that we will consider are: identifying Peirce’s most important articles and most important themes; potential mistakes in teaching Peirce; some common student misinterpretations; where to begin in the secondary literature, etc.  We are hoping for your contribution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This session was organized by James Campbell and Richard E. Hart (Bloomfield College).